having a coffe at the bar in Italian

Having a coffee at the bar in Italian

A moment of pleasure and socialization

In Italy, having coffee at the bar is a pleasant and very common invitation.

People who have just met often start with: Can I offer you something at the bar?

People who randomly run into each other after a long time often say: Come on, let’s have a coffee?

People make plans with: Let’s catch up and have a coffee together!

The coffee break at work is an almost sacred institution and another moment when this small ritual strengthens bonds between people.

All of this goes beyond the simple act of having a small cup of coffee; this tradition reflects the country’s love for good food and conviviality.

In ufficio
Paolo: Virginia, sono le 11.00, ti va se facciamo una pausa caffè?
Virginia: Certo, hai voglia di andare al bar?
Paolo: Sì, molto volentieri!
Al bar, alla cassa
Paolo: Tu, Virginia, che cosa prendi?
Virginia: Mmm… ho un po’ fame, penso che prenderò un cappuccino e cornetto.
Paolo: Per me solo un caffè. Oggi offro io.
Virginia: Ma no, dai, non devi!
Paolo: Scherzi!? Mi fa piacere.
Virginia: Va bene, grazie, vuol dire che la prossima volta offro io…
Paolo: Un caffè, un cappuccino e un cornetto, quant’è?
Cassiere: Sono 3,70 euro.
Paolo: (porgendo il denaro) Ecco a lei.
Cassiere: Il suo resto, prego.
Al bancone del bar
Barista: Buongiorno! Che vi preparo, cosa prendete oggi?
Paolo: Buongiorno, il solito, grazie.
Virginia: Per me, un cappuccino, grazie.
Barista: Perfetto, un cappuccino. Qualcosa da mangiare?
Virginia: Vorrei un cornetto, semplice, grazie.
Paolo: Per me niente, basta il caffè.

Barista: (porge il cornetto a Virginia) Ecco il cornetto. Un caffè e un cappuccino in arrivo. Volete che ve li porto al tavolo?

Paolo: Grazie ma per oggi prendiamo il caffè in piedi, abbiamo un po’ fretta.

Proposing a coffee break

Paolo: Virginia, sono le 11.00, ti va se facciamo una pausa caffè?
Virginia: Certo, hai voglia di andare al bar?
Paolo: Sì, molto volentieri!

In workplaces, colleagues often gather around the coffee machine or nearby bar to share a moment of relaxation.

The coffee break can happen in the morning or afternoon (especially after lunch), when people take a short break from work.

Common phrases used can be:
Ti va di fare una pausa caffè?
Hai voglia di un caffè?
Prendiamo qualcosa al bar?
Posso offrirti un caffè?
Responses can include:
Sì, certo, volentieri!
Sì, grazie, con piacere!

Asking someone what they’ll have at the bar and responding

Paolo: Tu, Virginia, che cosa prendi?
Virginia: Mmm… ho un po’ fame, penso che prenderò un cappuccino e cornetto.

Paolo: Per me solo un caffè.

Common phrases used can be:
Che cosa prendi?
Io prendo…
Per me…

Paying at the counter

Usually, at the bar, you go to the counter first, pay for your order, and then the receipt is placed on the counter for the bartender to verify payment.

Paolo: Un caffè, un cappuccino e un cornetto, quant’è?
Cassiere: Sono 3,70 euro.
Paolo: (porgendo il denaro) Ecco a lei.
Cassiere: Il suo resto, prego.
Common phrases used can be:
Quant’è?
Quanto viene in tutto?
Sono 3,70 euro.

Ordering coffee at the counter

When the receipt is placed on the counter, it is often accompanied by a small tip, the amount of which is decided by the customer with no obligation of a percentage.

Barista: Buongiorno! Che vi preparo, cosa prendete oggi?
Paolo: Buongiorno, il solito, grazie.
Virginia: Per me, un cappuccino, grazie.
Barista: Perfetto, un cappuccino. Qualcosa da mangiare?
Virginia: Vorrei un cornetto, semplice, grazie.
Paolo: Per me niente, basta il caffè.
Barista: (porge il cornetto a Virginia) Ecco il cornetto. Un caffè e un cappuccino in arrivo.
Phrases for ordering can be:
Un caffè, per favore.
Vorrei un caffè, per favore.
Mi fa un caffè, per favore?
Il solito, grazie!

When the customer is a regular and well-known by the baristas, and always orders the same, the response to the question

What will you have today?

is often

Il solito, grazie! (the usual, thanks!)

Offering coffee in Italian

Paolo: Oggi offro io.
Virginia: Ma no, dai, non devi!
Paolo: Scherzi!? Mi fa piacere.
Virginia: Va bene, Grazie, vuol dire che la prossima volta offro io…

At the moment of payment, a small battle often ensues to offer to pay for the drinks:

Oggi offro io.
Dai, oggi, faccio io!
No, dai, tocca a me!

Since there’s often a winner, it’s polite to respond with:

La prossima volta offro io!

And keep the promise…

Varieties of coffee in Italian

Italians are known for their passion for coffee and the variety of coffee-based drinks they consume.
Here’s a brief list of the most common coffee drinks you can find in Italian bars:

Espresso: The purest form of coffee, served in a small cup.

Caffè lungo: Similar to espresso but with more water, making it longer.

Caffè ristretto: A more concentrated espresso, obtained by reducing the water volume.

Caffè americano: Espresso diluted with more hot water.

Caffè corretto: Espresso “corrected” with a small amount of liquor, like grappa or sambuca.

Shakerato: Espresso shaken with ice and sugar, served cold.

Caffè freddo: Chilled espresso served with ice.

Caffè decaffeinato: Caffeine-free espresso, suitable for those who prefer to limit caffeine consumption.

Caffè con panna: Espresso with a dollop of whipped cream.

Marocchino: Espresso with a small amount of cocoa and a bit of steamed milk.

Caffè macchiato: Espresso “stained” with a small amount of milk foam.

Cappuccino: Espresso with steamed milk and milk foam. Espresso with steamed milk and milk foam. Often consumed at breakfast but NEVER after lunch!

Latte macchiato: Milk with a touch of coffee or espresso.

Caffè d’orzo: Barley-based drink, a caffeine-free alternative to coffee.

Caffè al ginseng: Espresso prepared with a blend of coffee and ginseng, often sweetened.

Cappuccino and cornetto

Virginia: Mmm… ho un po’ fame, penso che prenderò un cappuccino e cornetto.

The coffee break in Italy is often associated with a tasty pause.

Many accompany their coffee with a small delight, such as a croissant, a brioche, or a slice of cake, making cappuccino and cornetto a classic for breakfast or a substantial mid-morning snack.

Conclusion

The coffee moment is dedicated to pleasure, socialization, and enjoying the small things in life.

This tradition is a testament to the importance Italians place on moments of relaxation and interpersonal relationships, contributing to making daily life in Italy a rich and fulfilling experience.

Open chat
Hello 👋
Would you ask for more information?

Write me to ask your first FREE live italian lesson!